25 Things to Do During Summer at Waterton Lakes National Park

Published by To Do Canada On May 5, 2021Leave a response

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Jenny W/Flickr

In the southern part of Alberta, travellers will come across one of the most incredible national parks that the country can offer. Bordering on the United States, Waterton Lakes National Park encompasses an area that, along with the neighbouring Glacier National Park (USA), has been designated an international peace park, a World Heritage Site, and a Biosphere Reserve.

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Alberta Parks establishes $90 a year park pass for Kananaskis Country – Cochrane Today

he government of Alberta is establishing a Kananaskis Conservation Pass that will see vehicles charged a per day, or annual fee to access the region’s provincial parks and recreation areas, including those located in the Bow Valley corridor.a day ago By: Tanya Fouber

20210417 Heart Creek 0004Several dozen cars park along the Lac des Arcs highway exit and along the road to the Heart Creek trail head parking lot on Saturday (April 17). The parking lot was full. EVAN BUHLER RMO PHOTO

KANANASKIS COUNTRY— The government of Alberta is establishing a Kananaskis Conservation Pass that will see vehicles charged a per day or annual fee to access the region’s provincial parks and recreation areas in the Bow Valley corridor. 

Starting June 1, 2021, visiting K-country will cost recreational users $15 a day or $90 a year per vehicle. The regions a pass would be required includes popular hiking areas along Highway 1A, the Trans-Canada Highway and those accessed through trailheads in Canmore and around, such as Grassi Lakes. 

Environment and Parks Minister Jason Nixon said Tuesday (April 27) 100 per cent of the revenues from the initiative will go directly into managing of the area and conservation initiatives to protect it into the future. 

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Mount Yamnuska closing for upcoming season while crews upgrade paths

Alberta Parks will close the trail on May 21

Natalie Valleau · CBC News · Posted: Apr 18, 2021 10:50 AM MT | Last Updated: April 18

Mount Yamnuska trailhead, located near the M.D. of Bighorn in southern Alberta, will be closed as crews make some repairs and additions to the trails. (Helen Pike/CBC)

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Popular Alberta hiking spot Mount Yamnuska is closing for the season as trail crews do some much-needed improvements and restoration.

The site, located near the M.D. of Bighorn in southern Alberta, will be closed from May 21 to November this year, according to a notice on the Alberta Parks website.

During that time, there will be on-site upgrades to existing trails, construction for new sections and the decommissioning of non-sanctioned routes.

The mountain currently has a variety of trails that are hard to follow — some of which can lead to hikers getting lost and needing to be rescued by first responders.

Last summer, RCMP had to close the trail for a day after one fatality and several injuries occurred on a scree slope of the hike.

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Inexperienced Canadian campers leaving waste behind, and risking injury and animal conflict, warn experts – CBC Radio

Many areas lack critical infrastructure to handle high volume of tourists: Nick Frank

CBC Radio · Posted: Aug 20, 2020 3:03 PM ET

With holidays overseas on hold, Canadians are exploring the great outdoors at home, but not all of them are leaving it as great as they found it.  

“Most of the campers [behave] very well, but there is always that one per cent,” said Nick Frank, a backcountry camper and president of the Nordegg Community Association in Alberta.

“We’re seeing more garbage, we’re seeing human waste, we’re seeing animal conflicts,” he told The Current’s guest host Duncan McCue.

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8 Waterfall Hikes In Alberta That Only Locals Know About – from Narcity

If you love chasing waterfalls, chances are you’ve seen the Sunwapta Falls on repeat. But there are so many other cascading sights to discover off the beaten path. We’re spilling all the waterfall hikes in Alberta that only locals know about.

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Alberta parks meant to protect grizzlies heavily damaged by off-road vehicles: Study

Photo filed with article, full link and credit below.

Research suggests two parks proposed for the southwestern corner of Alberta are already so heavily used they’re becoming useless to the grizzly bears they are supposed to protect.

Analysis of the latest satellite imagery suggests less than half of the proposed Castle Wildland Park has enough undisturbed habitat to support the bears. Almost none of a provincial park planned for the same area has any secure habitat left, despite the region being considered a key link for grizzlies between British Columbia and Montana.

“It’s great that the government of Alberta is turning this into a special place with two parks,” said Wynet Smith of Global Forest Watch, which conducted the study. “But it’s evident from the data that there’s a lot of restoration required.”

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