La Ronge walking trail year-round addition funded – Welland Tribune

JRBy Jessica R. Durling, Local Journalism Initiative Reporter Humboldt Journal

Fri., May 7, 2021 timer2 min. read

Approximately seven kilometres of walking trails in La Ronge received provincial and federal funding so they can be made accessible year-round.

These additions include hard surfaces on areas that would be uncrossable in the summer.

“A lot of the trails are only usable in the winter time, after the ground has frozen because there’s some muskeg-y areas the trails go through,” said Tonia Logan, La Ronge’s recreation facility operations manager. “So we’ll either upgrade them with boardwalks or depending on since the price of lumber is so high, there might be other options we can look at.”

The trails are expected to be wide enough to accommodate strollers and bikes. Other modifications may include stairs in some areas as well as handrails.

Logan said the Town of La Ronge has been wanting to do the development for “some time.”

“We’re seeing a trend in parks and recreation that because of the pandemic people are focusing on their health and wellness and they’re trying to get outside and do more stuff,” she said.

“It is driven by the pandemic, and we do think that trend is going to continue and people will be excited about just being able to get outside and do their own type of recreation and leisure.”

The town will be working in partnership with the Boreal Outdoor Recreation Association (BORA), which developed those trails.

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New overnight backpackers’ guidebook out May 11

‘Backpacking in Southwestern British Columbia: The Essential Guide to Overnight Hiking Trails’ includes Sea to Sky Corridor trips.

2 days ago By: Jennifer Thuncher

Taryn EytonA shot from Rainbow Pass, one of the trips featured in Taryn Eyton’s new book. Courtesy Taryn Eyton

Taryn Eyton has written the book she wished existed for her when she started overnight backpacking.

Eyton, who is also the president of the Friends of Garibaldi Park Society, is the author of Backpacking in Southwestern British Columbia: The Essential Guide to Overnight Hiking Trails, which comes out on May 11. 

“This is the first guidebook, as far as I know, that focuses on backpacking,” she said. 

There are 40 spots featured in the book and they are all overnight or multi-day trips, with options for extending trips with day hikes beyond the campsites. 

Routes featured are from the North Shore up to Pemberton and Lytton, and from the Sunshine Coast out to the Similkameen Valley.

She includes information about how to book campsites, how many sites there are, where to source water, and how to store food. 

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25 Things to Do During Summer at Waterton Lakes National Park

Published by To Do Canada On May 5, 2021Leave a response

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Jenny W/Flickr

In the southern part of Alberta, travellers will come across one of the most incredible national parks that the country can offer. Bordering on the United States, Waterton Lakes National Park encompasses an area that, along with the neighbouring Glacier National Park (USA), has been designated an international peace park, a World Heritage Site, and a Biosphere Reserve.

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Seize on pandemic-fuelled enthusiasm for outdoors to expand protected wilderness, former parks chief urges

In recent weeks, Alberta’s government has moved to add user fees to some of its protected areas, citing the conservation needs from increased visitors seeking to get out of the city

Author of the article:Tyler DawsonPublishing date:May 03, 2021  •  2 days ago  •  4 minute read  •   19 Comments

A hiker looks at Lake O’Hara, located in Yoho National Park, in this undated handout image.
A hiker looks at Lake O’Hara, located in Yoho National Park, in this undated handout image. PHOTO BY THE CANADIAN PRESS

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EDMONTON — A former Parks Canada head says governments should look to expand protected wilderness in Canada, seizing on the enthusiasm for the outdoors that has emerged during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“I think it does help alleviate the potential impacts on existing parks and I think it creates new opportunities for people to connect with nature,” said Alan Latourelle, who headed the federal agency between 2002 and 2015. “We have a base of public support that we should seize at this time.”

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A pathway to Airdrie? How a citizen’s proposal captured the city’s imagination – CBC News

Airdrie, Rocky View County and Calgary would need to work together to make this pitch a reality

Helen Pike · CBC News · Posted: Apr 28, 2021 7:50 AM MT | Last Updated: April 28

Matthew Hicks bikes to Airdrie at least once a week to meet with clients for his photography business. (Helen Pike/CBC)

Airdrie is seriously considering a bike and pedestrian pathway that would connect the city to Calgary. 

Last week, the Airdrie city council reviewed a pitch complete with costs, stakeholders to engage, and a planned-out route to pave the path — and the idea, funnily enough, was presented by a Calgary-based photographer.

About a year ago, Matthew Hicks invested in an electronic cargo bike to cut his emissions for client meetings and shoots in Calgary. But he quickly realized that between pedaling and the extra electric-assisted power, he could push his bike range to Airdrie. 

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E-bike bylaw now in place for Whitehorse – Yukon News

Council adopts new bylaw despite opposition heard

Those who get around town by e-bike now have a new bylaw to refer to in determining which routes they can travel by.

A cyclist rides along Fourth Avenue in Whitehorse on October 15, 2019. The city has adopted its first e-bike bylaw. (Crystal Schick/Yukon News file)

At Whitehorse city council’s April 26 meeting, members approved third reading of the e-bike bylaw, along with changes to other bylaws to align with the e-bike bylaw.

The new regulations were passed despite more than a dozen presentations by phone and written submissions from residents opposed to parts of the bylaw. Many took issue with the classification system for e-bikes that determines which trails they may travel on.

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Peel’s top doctor says he wouldn’t recommend reopening outdoor activities right now – CP24

Kerrisa Wilson

Kerrisa Wilson, Web Content Writer, CP24

@kerrisawilson

Published Wednesday, April 28, 2021 11:28AM EDT

Peel Region’s top doctor says he wouldn’t recommend reopening outdoor recreational activities right now in order to avoid mixed messaging, as the province is under a stay-at-home order amid a third wave of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Medical Officer of Health Dr. Lawrence Loh says he would not call on the provincial government to reverse its decision about closing golf courses, basketball courts and other outdoor amenities as the Region of Peel continues to see heightened coronavirus cases and hospitalizations.

“At this time, however, I think calling for reopening is a bit challenging in my position because as I’ve said we are still not yet out of this very severe third wave and I think to the degree that we’re trying to really get people to understand essential meetings, essential purposes only and always with precautions,” Loh said during Brampton’s weekly COVID-19 press conference Wednesday morning.

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Alberta Parks establishes $90 a year park pass for Kananaskis Country – Cochrane Today

he government of Alberta is establishing a Kananaskis Conservation Pass that will see vehicles charged a per day, or annual fee to access the region’s provincial parks and recreation areas, including those located in the Bow Valley corridor.a day ago By: Tanya Fouber

20210417 Heart Creek 0004Several dozen cars park along the Lac des Arcs highway exit and along the road to the Heart Creek trail head parking lot on Saturday (April 17). The parking lot was full. EVAN BUHLER RMO PHOTO

KANANASKIS COUNTRY— The government of Alberta is establishing a Kananaskis Conservation Pass that will see vehicles charged a per day or annual fee to access the region’s provincial parks and recreation areas in the Bow Valley corridor. 

Starting June 1, 2021, visiting K-country will cost recreational users $15 a day or $90 a year per vehicle. The regions a pass would be required includes popular hiking areas along Highway 1A, the Trans-Canada Highway and those accessed through trailheads in Canmore and around, such as Grassi Lakes. 

Environment and Parks Minister Jason Nixon said Tuesday (April 27) 100 per cent of the revenues from the initiative will go directly into managing of the area and conservation initiatives to protect it into the future. 

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Attracting wildlife, developing trails part of property management in rural Thunder Bay – CBC

If you have a few hectares of rural property, but really don’t know what to do with it, Jeremy Innanen has a solution.

Innanen, who owns Innanen Outdoors, said he saw a need to give landowners some help with trail development, creating habitat, or growing food for horses and livestock.

“A lot of people own semi-rural properties and own chunks of land that really do fully enjoy having that property. So, giving them all the tools and the knowledge to help them, provide them with their property dreams,” he said.

Innanen said the idea of tailoring a property to attract specific animals, like white tailed deer, is more popular in southern Ontario or the midwest U.S.

“Your property gets utilized at different times of the year regarding travel of animals and the reason why they use those areas,” he said, noting that after a site visit, he could have a decent idea of where and why particular species would use a particular piece of land.

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Province announces infusion of funding for BC Parks

Promises for more campsites, expanded trails, and management—with details on Sea to Sky parks to come 2 days ago By: Alyssa Noel

Screen Shot 2021-04-22 at 3.02.09 PMThe provincial government has earmarked a record amount of funding for BC Parks over the next several years. Details on how that will impact Sea to Sky parks, like Garibaldi Provincial Park, pictured here, have not yet been announced. PHOTO BY ALYSSA NOEL

BC Parks will add two new summer employment opportunities in the Sea to Sky this year. 

A planning intern and an administrative intern will be based at Alice Lake Provincial Park in Squamish for 14 weeks, but “they are supporting parks in the region,” a spokesperson for B.C.’s Ministry of Environment & Climate Change Strategy said in an email. 

In total, $4 million has been set aside for the youth employment program with BC Parks and the BC Conservation Officer Service to fund 83 positions. That includes 37 youth positions with BC Parks and 46 with the Conservation Officer Service. 

The jobs will be spread throughout the province with job posts set to go up in the coming days. 

The Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society (CPAWS), BC Chapter, applauded the additional summer positions. 

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