Stay-at-home order, imposed on April 8 for 4 weeks, now extended until May 20

Muriel Draaisma · CBC News · Posted: Apr 17, 2021 4:51 PM ET | Last Updated: April 18

New restrictions are now in place that limit what people can and cannot do in Ontario as the province tries to curb a rising number of COVID-19 cases. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

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Ontario Premier Doug Ford announced new public health measures on Friday that tighten the stay-at-home order already in place and include new restrictions on travel between provinces.

The stay-at-home order, first imposed on April 8 for four weeks, will now be extended until May 20.

According to the provincial government, the new measures are intended to curb the rising number of COVID-19 cases as the third wave of the pandemic continues.

All of that means there are new limits on what residents can and cannot do. Here are some answers to questions you might have.

Can I go for a walk?

Yes. In its regulations, the government says: “An outdoor recreational amenity that is a park or recreational area may be open for the purposes of permitting persons to walk through the park or recreational area.”

Can I go for a walk with a friend?

This question is trickier.

The government says in its regulations that any person who uses outdoor parks and recreational areas, off-leash dog areas, or benches in parks and recreational areas “shall maintain a physical distance of at least two metres from any other person who is also using the amenity, other than a person who is a member of the same household, a member of one other household who lives alone or a caregiver for any member of either household.”

Can I gather with people outside of my household?

No, unless you live alone, and then you can gather with only one other household. The province said in a news release on Friday that it has prohibited “all outdoor social gatherings and organized public events, except for with members of the same household or one other person from outside that household who lives alone or a caregiver for any member of the household.”

Can I take my dog to an off-leash park?

Yes. But you have to maintain a two-metre distance from anyone who is not a member of your household and who is not a caregiver of a member of your household.

Can my children play at a playground?

Initially, the province said all outdoor playgrounds, play structures and equipment were not to be used, but in a tweet on Saturday afternoon, Ford said the government will roll back restrictions on playgrounds to allow their use.https://platform.twitter.com/embed/Tweet.html?dnt=false&embedId=twitter-widget-0&features=eyJ0ZndfZXhwZXJpbWVudHNfY29va2llX2V4cGlyYXRpb24iOnsiYnVja2V0IjoxMjA5NjAwLCJ2ZXJzaW9uIjpudWxsfSwidGZ3X2hvcml6b25fdHdlZXRfZW1iZWRfOTU1NSI6eyJidWNrZXQiOiJodGUiLCJ2ZXJzaW9uIjpudWxsfX0%3D&frame=false&hideCard=false&hideThread=false&id=1383498997092941834&lang=en&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cbc.ca%2Fnews%2Fcanada%2Ftoronto%2Fontario-restrictions-what-you-can-what-you-cannot-do-1.5991941&sessionId=cdd34e163bc73ce3a92315cba806180693765b80&siteScreenName=cbc&theme=light&widgetsVersion=ff2e7cf%3A1618526400629&width=550px

Dr. Isaac Bogoch, an infectious disease specialist based at Toronto General Hospital, said Saturday that the province should be encouraging people to go outside. Bogoch is also a member of Ontario’s COVID-19 vaccine distribution task force.

“It’s good for physical health. It’s good for mental health, especially with all the other horrible things that are going on in the middle of the third wave. Being outdoors is probably one of the best things you can do,” Bogoch said.

“It’s pretty clear that the outdoors is probably the safest place you could be during the course of the pandemic. We know that the risk of transmission outdoors is not zero per cent, but it’s getting close. It’s really, really low risk.”

Ontario Premier Doug Ford said on Saturday that the government will roll back restrictions on playgrounds to allow their use. (CBC)

The now-amended rules around playground use resulted in a tense situation for one Ottawa woman, who told CBC News she was threatened with a call to the police on Saturday morning by a stranger.

Simmi Dixit said she was walking through a park with her partner and young daughter when a man said he’d call the police on them because they were not allowed to be there. Dixit said they were not touching any outdoor amenities when they were confronted.

“People are at a point where they’re starting to emotionally break,” Dixit told CBC News.

“I think the narrative of fear that we’re hearing around COVID is affecting the way people judge themselves in these situations. We’re perceiving each other as threats instead of looking to each other for strength and support.”

Can I play golf on a golf course?

No. 

Can I play tennis and basketball at a court?

No. And you cannot use any amenities such as those for platform tennis, table tennis and pickleball courts.

Can I play baseball at a diamond?

No.

Can I enjoy a skate park or a BMX park?

No. And you can’t play Frisbee golf at such a location either.

Can I have a picnic at a picnic table?

No, you can’t. A picnic table is considered an outdoor amenity.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/ontario-restrictions-what-you-can-what-you-cannot-do-1.5991941

An Ontario Trails/Frank Cowan Company Webinar – “Covid-19 Research on Trails and Outdoor Recreation: What We’ve Learned so Far”

Hoping you would be able to attend this important webinar!
As we all deal with aspects of COVID-19, an understanding of its impacts on trails and trail use should help all of us plan and manage our trails throughout this pandemic.

Please consider attending.

To register go to:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/covid-19-research-on-trails-and-outdoor-recreation-what-weve-learned-so-f-tickets-118001199765

Just select the tickets button and you will be redirected.

OTC Membership up for renewal?

Please renew to take advantage of your free ticket for this and other webinars. 

We have another webinar on October 22 – Greenway Trail Networks – Combining Recreation and Nature.

https://www.ontariotrails.on.ca/support/join

Thanks

North Vancouver cyclist plans to ride across Canada wearing a face mask – Vancouver News

Jake Musgrave wants to raise awareness, funds for COVID-19 and leukemia research

a day ago By: Ben Bengtson

Jake Musgrave knows what it’s like to lose somebody close to you. Now, as a pandemic threatens people’s well-being the world over, he’s raising awareness and money so others don’t have to go through a similarly heartbreaking experience.

At the end of August Musgrave plans to bike across Canada, from Horseshoe Bay to Halifax, to raise money for leukemia research – as well as those impacted by COVID-19.

Musgrave, a lifelong North Vancouver resident, lost his dad, Randy, to leukemia when he was just eight years old.

Read the Article

Face masks also beneficial outdoors, says Canada’s top doctor – 660 News

OTTAWA  – Canada’s top doctor is encouraging Canadians to use face masks more frequently–not just when you’re in crowded indoor spaces.

Chief Public Health Officer Dr. Theresa Tam says physical distancing is still the most effective way to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

But with more and more Canadians taking advantage of the summer weather–hitting hiking trails, camping, or heading to the cabin or cottage–Tam says physical distancing might not always be all that practical.

Read the Article

COVID-19 Outdoors: Toronto Health Officials See No Signs Of Rising Cases From Outdoor Contact – HUFF Post

When Torontonians were spotted crowding beaches this past weekend, the public shaming followed. Ontario Premier Doug Ford said the photos that came out of Cherry Beach looked more like South Beach, Florida.

“And you’ve seen what happened down in Florida,” said Ford during a Monday briefing. “There [were] 4,000 cases in one day the other day.

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Participaction report card gives children a D-plus for physical activity – from the Chronicle Journal

Kids get D-plus in Participaction report card

Before the pandemic, Canadian children were barely getting a passing grade for overall physical activity and sedentary behaviours.

Restrictions from the COVID-19 crisis have made things even worse, according to numbers released Wednesday by Participaction.

The report card gave children and youths a D-plus for overall physical activity and a D-plus for sedentary behaviours, according to a two-year stretch of research and data analysis through February 2020.

“This report card confirms that children and youth in Canada are not as active as they should be and have too much screen time,” said Participaction scientist Dr. Mark Tremblay.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Parks Canada limiting people at tourist hot spots to prevent COVID-19 spread

“Coming to Banff National Park and some of our iconic spots will still look the same – the mountains are still the mountains and the beautiful places are still the beautiful places – just the way that we visit them is changing.”

Read the Full Article